Adding a few extra pounds to your waist increases your risk of heart failure, according to research

Carrying a few extra pounds around the middle isn’t just a sign that you might want to cut calories and exercise more.

The excess belly fat is also a warning you’re at higher risk for heart failure, a study suggests.

Oxford University researchers said each extra inch at the waist increases the threat by 11 percent and poses a greater heart health risk than overall weight.

The scientists analyzed data from 430,000 Britons aged 40 to 70 who were followed for an average of 13 years. Every extra inch of a healthy waist size was associated with a higher risk of a cardiac event, such as a heart attack, stroke, or cardiac arrhythmia.

Carrying a few extra pounds around your midsection isn't just a sign that you might want to cut calories and exercise more

Carrying a few extra pounds around your midsection isn't just a sign that you might want to cut calories and exercise more

Carrying a few extra pounds around the middle isn’t just a sign that you might want to cut calories and exercise more

One in five with the largest waists suffered 3.21 times more often than the fifth with the smallest waists.

But those with the largest body mass index (BMI), which accounts for weight and height, were only 2.65 times more likely to suffer than those with the smallest. Each additional BMI unit increased the likelihood of heart failure by 9 percent.

During the study, there were 8,669 very first heart failure events, many of which resulted in death.

Implant reduces hospital admissions

A breakthrough implant that collects data and warns doctors of declining health has reduced hospitalizations for heart patients by more than half, according to Congress.

Research in Manchester showed that the TriageHF Plus alert system flagged potential problems to allow for early treatment.

Lead researcher Dr. Ayodipupo Oguntade advised measuring yourself annually to monitor risk. “The amount of fat people carry around their torsos is more important for tracking body fat and cardiovascular risk,” he said.

“We know that the fat around the abdominal organs is very active and contains many inflammatory factors that can cause cardiovascular disease.”

Two in three Britons are overweight or obese, while heart disease accounts for a quarter of all deaths in the UK and claims nearly 500 lives every day.

Heart failure is a long-term condition in which blood cannot be pumped around the body, causing shortness of breath and other symptoms. In the UK, this translates into 100,000 hospital admissions a year.

Tam Fry of the National Obesity Forum said if a piece of tape half your height fits snugly around your bare waist, that’s a “healthy” weight range.

The results were presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona, ​​Spain.

Oxford University researchers (pictured) said each extra inch at the waist increases the threat by 11 percent and poses a greater heart health risk than overall weight

Oxford University researchers (pictured) said each extra inch at the waist increases the threat by 11 percent and poses a greater heart health risk than overall weight

Oxford University researchers (pictured) said each extra inch at the waist increases the threat by 11 percent and poses a greater heart health risk than overall weight

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk


https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/health-news/heart-failure-risk-is-increased-by-gaining-a-few-extra-pounds-on-the-waist-research-suggests/ Adding a few extra pounds to your waist increases your risk of heart failure, according to research

Brian Ashcraft

TheHiu.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@thehiu.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button