Austrian count, 70, who shot his wife’s dog ‘in revenge attack’ is fined £2,000

An Austrian count who shot his wife’s dog and hid his body in a “revenge attack” during “bitter” divorce proceedings has been fined £2,000.

Count Konrad Goess-Saurau, 70, claimed he was putting the pet out of its misery and denied a criminal damage charge on the grounds that it was prudent to “destroy” the animal to end its suffering.

Herman the German Pointer was owned solely by his wife, Countess Susan Goess-Saurau, prosecutor Ben Worthington told Swindon Magistrates’ Court on Friday.

The court heard how the Countess came to Temple Farm in Marlborough, Wiltshire on November 21 last year and could not find Herman.

Count Konrad Goess-Saurau, 70, claimed he was putting the animal out of its misery and dismissed a criminal damage charge on the grounds that it was prudent to

Count Konrad Goess-Saurau, 70, claimed he was putting the animal out of its misery and dismissed a criminal damage charge on the grounds that it was prudent to

Count Konrad Goess-Saurau, 70, claimed he was putting the animal out of its misery and dismissed a criminal damage charge on the grounds that it was prudent to “destroy” the animal to end its suffering

Herman - the slain German pointer - belonged solely to his wife, Countess Susan Goess-Saurau, prosecutor Ben Worthington told Swindon Magistrates' Court on Friday

Herman - the slain German pointer - belonged solely to his wife, Countess Susan Goess-Saurau, prosecutor Ben Worthington told Swindon Magistrates' Court on Friday

Herman – the slain German pointer – belonged solely to his wife, Countess Susan Goess-Saurau, prosecutor Ben Worthington told Swindon Magistrates’ Court on Friday

After looking at security camera footage showing her husband taking her dog, she contacted him.

She claimed his response was, “I put the dog down, he’s disgusting, nobody likes him.”

The Countess, who has been married to the Earl for 26 years, then reported the incident to Wiltshire Police.

She told the court: “We had a heated argument in the morning because he had peed the day before.

“I didn’t see it, but the dog peed through the banister onto the table below.”

Mr Worthington said: “The defendant had no permission to dispose of the dog in the way he did anyway.”

When Count Goess-Saurau's son Markus - from a previous marriage - came to the defense, he claimed Herman was a family pet who had a connection with everyone

When Count Goess-Saurau's son Markus - from a previous marriage - came to the defense, he claimed Herman was a family pet who had a connection with everyone

When Count Goess-Saurau’s son Markus – from a previous marriage – came to the defense, he claimed Herman was a family pet who had a connection with everyone

He said the count admitted to the shooting in a handwritten prepared statement handed to a police officer in an interview – but claimed the pet had cancer and was in agony.

“I admit that I shot Herman, my hunting dog. I shot him humanely and buried him with my game warden.”

“I had to walk the path of compassion to end Herman’s suffering.”

The Count also told police that the criminal case over Herman’s death was motivated by a divorce and obtaining a larger settlement.

But the Countess – a champion of foxhounds at VWH Hunt – claimed Herman, gifted by her mother Brenda Williams for her 46th birthday, has remained healthy and happy.

“He came riding with me every morning, and in the afternoon he was averaging 10 miles a day, so he was very, very fit,” she said.

Adding: “It was such a horrible thing, the dog didn’t deserve to die and it was my dog ​​not his dog.

“I love my dogs. When their time comes, it is done in a kind, calm, and compassionate manner.

“I think he had a lot of life left in him. He was just an old dog slowing down a bit.’

When asked by Benjamin Newton, who defended himself whether it would help in a divorce case if her husband had a criminal record, she replied: “I hadn’t considered that. I am determined to get justice for my dog ​​who didn’t deserve to die this way.

Ms Goess-Saurau said previous family dogs were taken to the vet to be euthanized at the end of their lives – never shot.

Christopher Willis, who has been a farrier at Temple Farm since 2006, told the court: “All dogs love a farrier so he was always happy to see me.

Prosecutors said the count admitted to the shooting in a handwritten prepared statement handed to a police officer in an interview - but claimed the pet had cancer and was in agony

Prosecutors said the count admitted to the shooting in a handwritten prepared statement handed to a police officer in an interview - but claimed the pet had cancer and was in agony

Prosecutors said the count admitted to the shooting in a handwritten prepared statement handed to a police officer in an interview – but claimed the pet had cancer and was in agony

But the Countess - a champion of foxhounds at VWH Hunt - claimed Herman, gifted by her mother Brenda Williams for her 46th birthday, has remained healthy and happy

But the Countess - a champion of foxhounds at VWH Hunt - claimed Herman, gifted by her mother Brenda Williams for her 46th birthday, has remained healthy and happy

But the Countess – a champion of foxhounds at VWH Hunt – claimed Herman, gifted by her mother Brenda Williams for her 46th birthday, has remained healthy and happy

“I never looked at him and thought he was going a little deaf or something.”

When Count Goess-Saurau’s son Markus – from a previous marriage – came to the defense, he claimed Herman was a family pet who had a connection with everyone.

He said: “He was a hunting dog, he hunted. He is known for killing deer. We struggled to stop him.”

He went on to say that at the time of the shooting, Herman had been deteriorating in age and was “sore, stiff and limping,” adding that his body was covered in “cancerous lumps.”

Markus told the court: “There wasn’t a part of his body you could put your hand on that didn’t have a bump.

“There was a problem in the house, something always had to be cleaned up in the morning, either urine or you name it poop.

Count Goess-Saurau's son, Markus, said that at the time of the shooting Herman had been deteriorating in age and was

Count Goess-Saurau's son, Markus, said that at the time of the shooting Herman had been deteriorating in age and was

Count Goess-Saurau’s son, Markus, said that at the time of the shooting Herman had been deteriorating in age and was “sore, stiff and limping”, adding that his body was covered in “cancerous lumps”.

“I’ve seen him happier given the dog he used to be.”

Temple Farm game warden Phil Holborow also said Herman was ill.

“He had bumps all over and his legs were shaky, his bum was walking, that’s how I would describe it. He was ill, the poor old boy looked ill.’

“In my words he had to be put down, in my words. I think he suffered.

‘He [the Count] told me the dog was shitting all over the house, he said “I think we have to take care of that”. He asked me to bury it, I did.’

Christopher Musgrove, former manager of Temple Farm for 35 years, described the earl as “an international businessman with a concern for the environment”.

Summing up, Mr Worthington told the three-man judges: “He was not at the end of his life; he didn’t have to be taken out and shot.’

He said the Countess was “clearly passionate about her dog’s health” and confirmed that Herman has been taken to the vet regularly throughout his life.

Mr Newton said his client was a man of good character and had a legitimate excuse to commit criminal harm.

He said Ms Goess-Saurau had “broader matters on her mind”.

Mr Worthington adds that using a firearm, namely a rifle, to kill the animal in a “revenge attack” is an aggravating feature.

The bank’s chairman, Beverly Payne, came to a guilty verdict.

She said: “We note that the relationship was and had been acrimonious to this day.

“We are sure that you are being unreasonable, you could have arranged for Herman to be taken to a vet to be put down like all other pets.

“You must have known that would have upset your wife. Therefore we find you guilty.’

Ms Payne described the offense as a “high level of planning” and fined her £2,000. He will also have to pay £620 in costs and a £200 surcharge.

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/uncategorized/austrian-count-70-who-shot-his-wifes-dog-in-revenge-attack-is-fined-2000/ Austrian count, 70, who shot his wife’s dog ‘in revenge attack’ is fined £2,000

Brian Ashcraft

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