Blood moon lunar eclipse stuns Sydney

Amateur astronomers were treated to a blushing moon across Australian skies during the last total lunar eclipse until 2025.

The eclipse began at 8:09 p.m. AEDT as the moon entered Earth’s shadow before an 85-minute total eclipse began at around 9:16 p.m.

The red tint is caused by the little sunlight that slips through Earth’s atmosphere and into the part of space shadowed by the sun.

The eclipse began at 8:09 p.m. AEDT as the moon entered Earth's shadow before an 85-minute total eclipse began at around 9:16 p.m

The eclipse began at 8:09 p.m. AEDT as the moon entered Earth's shadow before an 85-minute total eclipse began at around 9:16 p.m

The eclipse began at 8:09 p.m. AEDT as the moon entered Earth’s shadow before an 85-minute total eclipse began at around 9:16 p.m

A child plays with an umbrella in front of the full moon rising ahead of a total lunar eclipse in Stanwell Park, south of Sydney, Tuesday November 2022

A child plays with an umbrella in front of the full moon rising ahead of a total lunar eclipse in Stanwell Park, south of Sydney, Tuesday November 2022

A child plays with an umbrella in front of the full moon rising ahead of a total lunar eclipse in Stanwell Park, south of Sydney, Tuesday November 2022

“Just as sunrise and sunset are orange or reddish in color, so is this light that streaks through Earth’s atmosphere and out into space,” said Australian National University astrophysicist Brad Tucker.

While part or all of Australia will be in position for a handful of penumbral or partial lunar eclipses over the next two years, the next total lunar eclipse will not occur until March 2025.

Western Australia will experience a total lunar eclipse in September 2025, while the east coast will not experience a total lunar eclipse until March 2026.

Preparations are underway in Exmouth for a rare total lunar eclipse scheduled for April 2023.

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The “blood moon” event occurs when the sun, earth, and moon align, causing the moon to move into the earth’s shadow.

When the moon is completely covered, it turns a deep red – the reason for the ‘blood moon’ nickname.

On the east coast, the event begins at 8:09 p.m., with the total solar eclipse expected to begin at 9:16 p.m., while in Queensland it begins an hour earlier.

The event starts at 7.43pm in South Australia, 6.42pm in the Northern Territory and 6.43pm on the West Coast.

A rare lunar event that paints the moon deep reds across Australia will occur tonight during the last lunar eclipse for three years

A rare lunar event that paints the moon deep reds across Australia will occur tonight during the last lunar eclipse for three years

A rare lunar event that paints the moon deep reds across Australia will occur tonight during the last lunar eclipse for three years

The Blood Moon event occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Moon align, causing the Moon to transition into Earth's shadow. When the moon is completely covered, it turns deep red, which is why it is called

The Blood Moon event occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Moon align, causing the Moon to transition into Earth's shadow. When the moon is completely covered, it turns deep red, which is why it is called

The Blood Moon event occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Moon align, causing the Moon to transition into Earth’s shadow. When the moon is completely covered, it turns a deep red, which is why it is known as the “blood moon”.

Astronomer at Melbourne Planetarium, Dr. Tanya Hill told the ABC that this “blood moon” will be a long lunar eclipse and the last until 2025.

“I love lunar eclipses because they happen at the same time for everyone, it’s just the time zone that changes things,” said Dr. Hill.

“We should get out to see this total lunar eclipse because we won’t see another one in Australia until September 8, 2025.”

A “blood moon eclipse” occurs in three phases: penumbral, partial, and total.

penumbral phase

The penumbral phase is the beginning of the solar eclipse and can hardly be seen with the naked eye.

During this phase, the moon passes through the outer shadow of the earth.

The second penumbral phase occurs after the total solar eclipse, when the moon returns to Earth’s outer shadow.

partial phase

The partial phase occurs when the moon crosses the edge of the planet’s central shadow.

During this phase, Earth’s shadow slowly moves across the Moon’s face, blocking its brightly lit center, leaving only a thin, glowing outer stripe of the Moon’s rim visible.

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The partial phase lasts up to the point where the outer band disappears completely and the moon is in full earth’s shadow, beginning the final phase.

The second sub-phase begins when a bright light reappears at the moon’s edge as it begins to move back out of Earth’s shadow.

total phase

The total phase is when the moon is completely in the shadow of the earth.

In this phase, the moon appears in the deepest red “blood” color.

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/uncategorized/blood-moon-lunar-eclipse-stuns-sydney/ Blood moon lunar eclipse stuns Sydney

Brian Ashcraft

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