Brave 13-year-old girl beats leukemia in world’s first clinical trial

A 13-year-old girl was cured of her terminal cancer after a world-first study with a revolutionary kind of medicine.

Alyssa had undergone chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant – but her leukemia remained.

The Leicester teenager was then given genetically engineered T cells during the first use of the therapy at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London.

Doctors said that without treatment her next step would have been palliative care, but within a month Alyssa went into remission.

Alyssa, 13, had undergone chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant - but her leukemia remained

Alyssa, 13, had undergone chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant - but her leukemia remained

Alyssa, 13, had undergone chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant – but her leukemia remained

The Leicester teenager was then given genetically engineered T cells during the first use of the therapy at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London

The Leicester teenager was then given genetically engineered T cells during the first use of the therapy at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London

The Leicester teenager was then given genetically engineered T cells during the first use of the therapy at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London

Ahead of the experimental treatment, Alyssa said, “Once I do it, people will know what they need to do, one way or another, so it’s going to help people do that — of course I’m going to do it.”

The pre-made cells from a healthy volunteer donor have been engineered with new technology so they can hunt down and kill cancerous T cells without attacking each other. T cells are white blood cells that move around the body to find and destroy defective cells.

Alyssa was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) last year. It is the most common cancer in children and adolescents, affecting 500 each year, and the survival rate for those whose T-ALL has relapsed is only 10 percent.

Alyssa was the first patient in the T-cell clinical trial funded by the Medical Research Council.

Ahead of the treatment, Alyssa said,

Ahead of the treatment, Alyssa said,

Ahead of the treatment, Alyssa said, “Once I do it, people will know what they need to do, one way or another, so it’s going to help people do that — of course I’m going to do it.”

Twenty-eight days after treatment, Alyssa was in remission and able to receive a second bone marrow transplant. She is said to be “fine at home” and is continuing with aftercare at Great Ormond Street. Scientists working on the clinical trial hope to enroll up to 10 T-ALL patients who have exhausted all conventional options.

Professor Waseem Qasim, Consulting Immunologist at GOSH, said: “This is a great demonstration of how, with expert teams and infrastructure, we can combine cutting-edge technologies in the laboratory with real outcomes in the hospital for patients. It is our most advanced cell engineering to date and paves the way for other new treatments and ultimately a brighter future for sick children.”

Alyssa’s mother, Kiona, said the family is “on strange cloud nine”.

She added: “Hopefully this can prove the research is working and they can offer it to more kids – all of this must have been for something.”

Rishi welcomes the mail campaign fight childhood cancer

By Kate Pickles and Jason Groves for The Daily Mail

Rishi Sunak today declares he is “proud” to support the Daily Mail’s childhood cancer campaign.

Praising this paper’s partnership with Cancer Research UK, the Prime Minister said more needed to be done to tackle childhood cancer and fully supported the “awarded” cause.

The Mail has teamed up with Cancer Research UK to launch the Fighting to Beat Children’s Cancer campaign, which raises money for research into childhood and adolescent cancer.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak (pictured) said more needs to be done to tackle childhood cancer and gave his full support to the

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak (pictured) said more needs to be done to tackle childhood cancer and gave his full support to the

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak (pictured) said more needs to be done to tackle childhood cancer and gave his full support to the ‘awarded’ cause

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The Government announced last month that it was making £22.5million available to help develop new therapies, including targeted vaccines, and find methods for earlier diagnosis.

Mr Sunak said: “I am proud to support the excellent Fighting to Beat Children’s Cancer campaign being run by the Daily Mail and Cancer Research UK.

“The NHS is diagnosing many more cancer patients at an earlier stage than before, but we need to do more to improve treatment and outcomes, particularly in children.

“That’s why we’re investing tens of millions of pounds in life-saving cancer research and opening over 100 community diagnostic centers across the country doing two million tests, scans and screenings on-site.”

Mr. Sunak added, “Together we can beat cancer and the Fighting to Beat Children’s Cancer campaign is a most welcome contribution to that effort.”

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The government wants to track the success of strategies used to secure and roll out the Covid vaccine.

The funding will be part of the NHS Cancer Scheme which aims to detect three quarters of stage one or stage two cancers by 2028.

The program also aims to help 55,000 more people survive at least five years after diagnosis each year.

Cancer remains the leading cause of disease-related deaths among young people in the UK, killing one in five of those diagnosed – around 500 a year.

Cancer Research UK estimates cases will increase by a fifth by 2040.

All funds raised will support the charity’s work on cancer in young people to help more 0-24 year olds survive with a good quality of life.

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/uncategorized/brave-girl-of-13-beats-leukaemia-in-world-first-clinical-trial/ Brave 13-year-old girl beats leukemia in world’s first clinical trial

Brian Ashcraft

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