China is the “biggest state threat to economic security,” Rishi Sunak warned at the G20 summit

Rishi Sunak has been warned not to soften Britain’s stance on China after refusing to describe Britain as a “systemic threat” to Britain.

The prime minister declined to confirm that he would respect his predecessor Liz Truss’ plans to step up anti-Beijing rhetoric while speaking at the G20 summit in Bali, which is also attended by autocrat Xi Jinping.

During her brief stint at No10, she planned to formally harden Britain’s position on the communist regime, describing it as a ‘menace’ rather than a ‘competitor’, as is currently the case.

However, when asked in Indonesia whether he would respect this decision, he said: “In my view, China poses a systemic challenge to our values ​​and interests and poses the greatest state threat to our economic security.”

“By the way, I think that view agrees very well with our allies.”

He continued: “But I also think that China is an undeniable fact of the world economy and we will not be able to solve common global challenges like climate change or public health, or actually deal with Russia and Ukraine without.” to have a dialogue with them.”

Leaving open the possibility of meeting Mr. Xi, Mr. Sunak said ahead of the meeting in Bali, “Hopefully I will also have a chance to talk to him.”

But Tory China Hawk Sir Iain Duncan Smith warned against any move that could be seen as “appeasing” the Beijing regime.

The prime minister is attending the G20 summit in Bali with other leaders of the world's major economies, including China's Xi Jinping.

The prime minister is attending the G20 summit in Bali with other leaders of the world's major economies, including China's Xi Jinping.

The prime minister is attending the G20 summit in Bali with other leaders of the world’s major economies, including China’s Xi Jinping.

Joe Biden held much-anticipated talks with the Chinese leader on Monday, in which the US president objected to Beijing's

Joe Biden held much-anticipated talks with the Chinese leader on Monday, in which the US president objected to Beijing's

Joe Biden held much-anticipated talks with the Chinese leader on Monday, in which the US president objected to Beijing’s “forced and increasingly aggressive crackdown” on Taiwan.

The MP and former leader of the Conservative Party told Talk TV: “He said categorically over the summer that he saw China as a systemic threat. So what we’re seeing here right now I think is the beginning of a step away from its original position.

“I think he felt that in the end we would make the decision to ensure that China was seen as a strategic challenge or a competitor in the integrated review where Russia poses a threat. Now of course we wanted to move it so they became a threat because everything starts from that position.

“Everything in government flows, the way we treat the Chinese diplomats over here, the ones who thrashed the peaceful protesters in Manchester, the way we deal with the Confucius Institutes spying on Chinese students , or even those fake Chinese police stations that threaten Chinese expatriates and try to take them back to China.

“All of those are aggressive moves and it’s time to call them what they are, a threat, but I hope he doesn’t do a U-turn, that would be totally wrong.

“And what is happening in the government at the moment would really appease China.”

The prime minister is attending the G20 summit in Bali with other leaders of the world’s major economies, including China’s Xi Jinping.

Britain will consider sending arms to help Taiwan defend itself in the event of an attack from Beijing, Mr Sunak also said.

The Prime Minister said it was “important” that Britain defended itself against this, for example through the National Security Investment Act, which allows the government to block investment in British companies that could affect the country’s security.

Joe Biden held much-anticipated talks with the Chinese leader on Monday, in which the US president objected to Beijing’s “forced and increasingly aggressive crackdown” on Taiwan.

For Mr. Sunak, China’s economic influence means it will be necessary to carefully weigh trade advantages against Beijing’s political motivations.

The UK and China are deeply divided over human rights, particularly in Hong Kong, and Beijing’s refusal to publicly condemn Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Mr. Xi has tightened his grip on power with an unprecedented third term, which may embolden him to take a more assertive stance on the West and Taiwan.

Liz Truss said in the summer that Western allies should learn the lessons from Ukraine and give Taiwan more support.

Asked if he agreed with his predecessor that the UK should send arms to the self-governing island, Mr Sunak said it was an option that would be considered in an overhaul of the foreign and defense policy review.

He added: “We review all of these policies as part of our built-in review update.

“Our policy towards Taiwan is obvious that there should be no unilateral change of status and that there should be a peaceful solution to this situation. We stand ready to support Taiwan as we do to resist Chinese aggression.’

Taiwan has been self-governing since nationalist forces fled there in 1949 after the communists took control of China.

It is viewed as a rebel province by China, which claims the island as its territory and opposes any cooperation by Taiwanese officials with foreign governments.

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/uncategorized/china-is-the-biggest-state-threat-to-economic-security-rishi-sunak-warns-at-g20-summit/ China is the “biggest state threat to economic security,” Rishi Sunak warned at the G20 summit

Brian Ashcraft

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