Chinese model defends participation in advert that some say includes stereotypes insulting Asians

After an ad for fast food brand Three Squirrels received backlash from critics who said it depicts the stereotype of “slanted eyes” of Asians being offended, the Chinese model appeared in the ad. Fox has defended her participation.

In a post on the Chinese microblogging site Weibo, the model, with the username Cai Niangniang, criticized the personal backlash she received for her participation and said she felt ” really helpless.”

“Just because of my small eyes, I’m not pretty enough to be Chinese. I don’t know what to say to these comments,” she wrote.

Critics have accused the model of spreading Western “slanted-eyed” stereotypes in advertisements for Ba Soc’s noodle products on her Weibo account.

Cai said: “As a professional model, what I need to do is take pictures that match what the client wants.

“I hope people online stop messaging me. I’m not a supermodel nor a public figure, I’m just a lover of my country and a law-abiding citizen.” She added.

Her response to the criticism has received more than 330 million views, according to the Chinese communist party publication. Global Times.

Ad backlash
After an ad for fast food brand Three Squirrels received backlash from critics, who said it depicts the derogatory stereotype of Asian “slanted eyes”, a Chinese model appeared. appeared in the advertisement defended her participation. Above, a woman wearing a mask stands near an advertisement featuring models for makeup products in Beijing, China, Tuesday, December 28, 2021.
Ng Han Guan / AP Photo

Mercedes Benz was also attacked by several Chinese websites for allegedly using a model with “slanted eyes” in its ads on Weibo. The company did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The “slanted-eyed” stereotype emerged in the West in the 19th century and was seen as derogatory and insulting to Asians.

The latest backlash over the ads came after luxury brand Dior apologized and retracted a photo at an art show that showed an Asian model with freckles and very heavy make-up posing. holding a Dior handbag. Responding to criticism in China, the company said it “respects the feelings of the Chinese people.”

Three Squirrels said in a post Saturday on its official Weibo account that it did not intend to portray a Chinese in a bad light. The company said the ad was filmed in 2019. The model is Chinese and the makeup style is designed to match her natural features.

“In response to feedback from netizens that the model’s makeup did not conform to widely recognized aesthetic standards and caused discomfort, our company apologizes,” the statement read.

“The page has been replaced and it’s arranged to check other company sites to make sure this doesn’t happen again.”

Online, Chinese netizens have criticized the choice of models and the makeup style that deliberately depicts the image of “slanted eyes”.

One user holding a MaoBuErXiong said that such slanting eyes are insulting and deeply ingrained in the fashion industry, with Asian models and their makeup often chosen to fit the mold. sample.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Accusations of Asian stereotyping
Ads for some Chinese models have sparked a feud in China over whether their looks and makeup are perpetuating harmful stereotypes about Asians. Above, women wearing masks walk past advertisements showcasing models for makeup products in Beijing, China, Tuesday, December 28, 2021.
Ng Han Guan / AP Photo

https://www.newsweek.com/chinese-model-defends-participation-ad-some-say-included-derogatory-asian-stereotype-1663585 Chinese model defends participation in advert that some say includes stereotypes insulting Asians

Brian Ashcraft

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