Crocodile bites and poisonous mushrooms: The strangest reasons why Brits needed the NHS after lockdown

Crocodile bites, volcanic eruptions and the ingestion of poisonous mushrooms.

These are just some of the strange ways Brits have injured themselves in the first year after lockdown.

MailOnline has analyzed the most bizarre reasons people in England required NHS hospital care between April 1st 2021 and March 31st this year.

In one case, a 65-year-old woman was bitten by a crocodile, and in three cases, people were hospitalized in the comfort of their homes after “contact with a sea creature.”

Natural disasters also played a role, with four admissions due to volcano exposure, according to data released yesterday.

There were also 52 cases of poisoning after eating poisonous mushrooms – slightly fewer than last year.

An “excessive sex drive” was behind 28 admissions, with hundreds more to remove “foreign objects” from the rectum, vagina and urethra.

Up to 10 Britons have required hospital treatment after being bitten by crocodiles in 2021-22, three of which were emergencies

Up to 10 Britons have required hospital treatment after being bitten by crocodiles in 2021-22, three of which were emergencies

Up to 10 Britons have required hospital treatment after being bitten by crocodiles in 2021-22, three of which were emergencies

While the nation’s attention remained focused on Covid for much of the year, other pathogens such as anthrax and the plague were also hitting dozens of people.

Meanwhile, two men, one in his 20s and another in his 70s, required NHS care after being exposed to “biological weapons”.

The NHS does not include information on patients beyond age and gender for reasons of confidentiality.

This means that a patient could theoretically appear more than once in the data set.

And the statistics don’t include cases where people would have gone to their GP instead.

Additionally, some incidents are more of a follow-up than an immediate reason for admission.

For example, there are no volcanoes in Britain, so Brits treated for volcanic-related injuries could have been injured abroad and then needed care on their return.

Also, some people are diagnosed with an illness while being treated for something else, with medical professionals not realizing that a patient has an illness or condition until they come to the hospital for another reason.

Animal attacks from creatures large and small

Dogs continued to dominate as the leading cause of animal-based admissions, with nearly 10,000 for bites or collisions alone.

But Britons also sent a host of other creatures to the NHS last year.

The reason given in 10 cases last year was a hit or bite from a “crocodile or alligator”.

Curiously, two of these happened in patients’ own homes, others in places like zoos, wildlife parks, or “unknown” locations.

The youngest case was in a girl between the ages of five and nine, and the oldest in a woman in her 90s.

Both were bitten by a crocodile while in a “school, other institution and public administration area” that could technically be a zoo. However, none of the injuries appear to have been serious.

However, three cases involved two admissions requiring hospitalization and one classified as “emergency care”.

There were 69 admissions for venomous snake bites, 13 of them in under 18 year olds. Of the total cases, 13 were classified as emergencies.

The UK has only one native venomous snake, the adder, although people can buy potentially deadly exotic species as pets.

Venomous spiders were behind 21 shots while scorpion stings were behind three. One was even for a patient who was bitten or sprayed by a poisoned centipede or centipede.

Three admissions, involving at least two people, were hospitalized at their homes after “contact with a sea creature.”

Shockingly, two were classified as emergency rooms.

Natural disasters, volcanic eruptions, poisonous mushrooms and war

Four recordings involving Brits in their 30’s and 40’s had to be dealt with due to a volcanic eruption.

All cases will have occurred abroad as the UK has no active volcanoes within its borders. However, this cannot be confirmed by the published data.

Just five shots were for Britons struck by lightning in the latest NHS data, down from 19 in the first year of the pandemic.

Poisonous mushroom ingestion was the reason for 52 treatments, 23 of which were emergency.

Poisonous mushrooms were behind 52 hospital admissions in England last year, pictured here is a deadly strain of deathcap

Poisonous mushrooms were behind 52 hospital admissions in England last year, pictured here is a deadly strain of deathcap

Poisonous mushrooms were behind 52 hospital admissions in England last year, pictured here is a deadly strain of deathcap

One of the most bizarre cases in the NHS data involved two men being treated for “biological weapons warfare operations”.

No details were given of the weapon involved, but one man was in his early 20s and the other in his late 70s.

One required hospital monitoring after being exposed to the gun.

Disgusting diseases 2021-22, from the Black Death to maggots in eyeballs

Covid may have dominated the headlines for most of 2021-22 but there were other pathogens and infections sending patients to the hospital.

There were a total of 41 recordings for The Plague, known as the Black Death because it killed millions of Europeans during the Middle Ages.

It got its name from the black sores that appeared on the bodies of those infected.

The disease, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, was transmitted by fleas on the backs of rats. In this day and age, it’s far less dangerous thanks to antibiotics, but can still be deadly if not treated quickly enough.

Most of the 41 cases in England were of pneumonic plague, an airborne version of the disease.

However, one case in a 10-year-old boy was the bumpy form of the disease, which produces the famous boils.

Illustration of the bacterium Yersinia pestis responsible for the disease known as the plague or Black Death which killed millions as it swept across Europe in the Middle Ages. Twenty-eight Britons contracted either the bubo or pneumonia version of the disease, with 14 other cases having unspecified or unknown variants of the disease

Illustration of the bacterium Yersinia pestis responsible for the disease known as the plague or Black Death which killed millions as it swept across Europe in the Middle Ages. Twenty-eight Britons contracted either the bubo or pneumonia version of the disease, with 14 other cases having unspecified or unknown variants of the disease

Illustration of the bacterium Yersinia pestis responsible for the disease known as the plague or Black Death which killed millions as it swept across Europe in the Middle Ages. Twenty-eight Britons contracted either the bubo or pneumonia version of the disease, with 14 other cases having unspecified or unknown variants of the disease

Five cases of anthrax, a disease usually associated with ancient history or bioterrorism, were also reported in the 2020-21 NHS data.

Four of these concerned anthrax sepsis, where anthrax spores enter the bloodstream directly, e.g. B. through a needle.

Cases of anthrax sepsis have been reported among heroin users in the UK.

The remaining case was an emergency room visit for a 76-year-old man who contracted cutaneous anthrax, in which spores of the bacteria enter an open wound and cause infection.

Most people who get this type of anthrax infection work with contaminated animals or animal products. It is almost always treated successfully when a person has access to advanced medical care.

One of the worst infections has been ocular myiasis, where flies place maggots in one or both eyes of a patient.

A total of 72 cases with an average age of 62 years were recorded.

Sexual disorders and unfortunate insertions into intimate areas

Brits needed NHS treatment for a variety of sexual disorders in 2021-22.

A total of 28 admissions were of Britons diagnosed with “excessive sex drive”, which could mean they have been diagnosed with a sex addiction.

The cases were almost evenly split in terms of gender, with the mean age of the patients being 58 years.

Five cases were registered in patients over 85 years of age. As with all grounds requiring treatment, some or all may involve the same patient who has been treated more than once.

Three admissions among men concerned exhibitionism, a fetish in which people are aroused by showing their naked bodies to others.

A 39-year-old man was treated for voyeurism, the practice of deriving sexual pleasure from watching or staring at others having sex when they are naked.

Up to 28 Britons were diagnosed with'excessive sex drive' by the NHS last year, with cases split almost equally between men and women (stock image)

Up to 28 Britons were diagnosed with'excessive sex drive' by the NHS last year, with cases split almost equally between men and women (stock image)

Up to 28 Britons were diagnosed with ‘excessive sex drive’ by the NHS last year, with cases split almost equally between men and women (stock image)

Nearly 2,500 admissions were for Britons who needed to have foreign objects removed from their rectum, vagina or urethra.

The NHS recorded 1,121 cases of objects being pulled from the rectum, a complaint twice as common in men as women.

There are 1,073 objects removed from vaginas and 253 cases where someone got an object stuck in their vagina Urethra.

The insertion of objects into the urethra for the purpose of sexual pleasure is known as probing, but objects inserted this way run the risk of becoming lodged and requiring medical attention to extract them.

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk


https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/health-news/crocodile-bites-and-toxic-mushrooms-the-weirdest-reasons-britons-needed-the-nhs-post-lockdown/ Crocodile bites and poisonous mushrooms: The strangest reasons why Brits needed the NHS after lockdown

Brian Ashcraft

TheHiu.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@thehiu.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button