Epileptic technician, 36, tells how he lost both legs: Now runs marathons with prostheses

A man who lost both legs after suffering a seizure and falling onto a subway platform in New York City plans to compete in a 5K steeplechase and a 6K race this weekend, after training with prosthetic legs for a year.

Roman Leykin, 36, a former Brooklyn technician who was diagnosed with epilepsy as a teenager, suffered a seizure on his way to work in February 2018, the Stamford Advocate reported.

The sudden attack caused him to fall onto the subway tracks when a train ran him over, resulting in traumatic brain injury and amputation of his legs.

Unable to do his job anymore, Leykin has dedicated himself to the world of athletics, completing the Gaylord Guantlet 5K steeplechase on Saturday and the Achilles Hope & Possibility 6K on Sunday.

“Right now I’m going to as many amputee events as I can around the country and pretty soon around the world,” Leykin told the Advocate. ‘I can not stop.’

Roman Leykin, 36, suffered traumatic brain injury and had both legs amputated after being hit by a New York City subway in 2018. Leykin, who was forced to quit his job as a technician, was able to walk with his new prosthesis within a year

Roman Leykin, 36, suffered traumatic brain injury and had both legs amputated after being hit by a New York City subway in 2018. Leykin, who was forced to quit his job as a technician, was able to walk with his new prosthesis within a year

Roman Leykin, 36, suffered traumatic brain injury and had both legs amputated after being hit by a New York City subway in 2018. Leykin, who was forced to quit his job as a technician, was able to walk with his new prosthesis within a year

Leykin went for a walk with his

Leykin went for a walk with his

Leykin has come a long way after falling for the first time with his legs last year

Leykin has come a long way after falling for the first time with his legs last year

Leykin (above) is confident he can walk with the new prosthesis as he completed a 5K steeplechase on Saturday and plans to complete a 6K on Sunday

Leykin, who worked as a web developer in Manhattan, said the moments after his accident in 2018 were blurred after he passed out from the brain injury he sustained.

He spent a year at Burke Rehabilitation Hospital in White Plains, New York, using a wheelchair until 2021.

It was a big year for Leykin, who committed to walking with short prosthetics.

“I jumped out of my wheelchair, took a few steps and fell down right away,” Leykin told the Advocate of his first attempt at the Stubbies.

“I stood up straight away. And I fell And I got up right away. And I fell

“And within 15 or 20 minutes I was walking not holding on to anything. Yes, I was smaller, but the freedom of movement gave me the freedom of life.’

Leykin documents his progress on Instagram and TikTok, where he has nearly 200,000 followers. In May 2021, Leykin takes small, awkward steps before falling over the freedom of mobility with a smile on his face.

Since then, Leykin has progressed to longer “technical legs” as he enjoys hiking, sailing, golfing, bowling, rock climbing, hockey, skiing, and other sports.

“I’m a very competitive person. i love to sweat So if I’m doing anything that makes you sweat, I feel great no matter what the activity,” he said.

Leykin spent a year recovering from his accident and is now dedicating himself to training his body

Leykin spent a year recovering from his accident and is now dedicating himself to training his body

Leykin spent a year recovering from his accident and is now dedicating himself to training his body

He has taken on a plethora of different sports including rock climbing earlier this year

He has taken on a plethora of different sports including rock climbing earlier this year

He has taken on a plethora of different sports including rock climbing earlier this year

With his new long prosthetic legs, Leykin has also taken up cycling

With his new long prosthetic legs, Leykin has also taken up cycling

With his new long prosthetic legs, Leykin has also taken up cycling

Leykin’s latest venture was the chaotic Gaylord Gauntlet, a charity obstacle course hosted by Gaylord Specialty Healthcare on their Wallingford campus.

The 5K event includes hikes through forest and mud hills, hurdles over trees and walls, and a slide into a pool of water. In all, the race consisted of 24 obstacles that Leykin and others had to overcome.

Gaylord Sports Association program manager Katie Joly praised Leykin for his drive and ability to transform his life.

“A lot of times people get the confidence back to be who they are because … a lot of people that we work with have had spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury, loss of limbs, like Rome , and her learning to live their lives differently,” Joly told the attorney.

The Gaylord Gauntlet contained 24 obstacles for Leykin and others to overcome

The Gaylord Gauntlet contained 24 obstacles for Leykin and others to overcome

The Gaylord Gauntlet contained 24 obstacles for Leykin and others to overcome

Obstacles include a climbing wall after a hike through mud hills

Obstacles include a climbing wall after a hike through mud hills

Obstacles include a climbing wall after a hike through mud hills

The penultimate obstacle is a slide into a water pit

The penultimate obstacle is a slide into a water pit

The penultimate obstacle is a slide into a water pit

The fun but grueling course would leave most people too sore to exercise the next day, but Leykin opts instead to tackle the 20th annual Achilles Hope & Possibility four-mile race on Sunday.

The race, which is scheduled to begin in New York City’s Central Park in the morning, celebrates the inclusion of the disabled and allows everyone to participate in the event following the anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Leykin told the Advocate he was excited to enter the race and was keen to follow his mantra: “Relentless positive forward momentum”.

The athlete said he always moves forward, jokingly warning others, “I won’t get in your way, but don’t you dare get in mine because… you might get run over, you might get run over, you might run over.” ‘

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/uncategorized/epileptic-tech-worker-36-shares-how-he-lost-both-legs-is-now-running-marathon-on-prosthetics/ Epileptic technician, 36, tells how he lost both legs: Now runs marathons with prostheses

Brian Ashcraft

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