Expert warns that Covid-induced odor loss is returning with the BA.5 variant

Loss of smell associated with COVID-19 infection is making a return, but an expert believes the condition can be treated at home with goods a person likely already has around the house.

One of the earliest unique side effects of COVID-19 infection was the loss of taste and smell experienced by those infected. However, the prevalence of odor issues seemed to go away when the Omicron variant caught on late last year.

With the advent of the BA.5 variant, experts have noticed a trend for these issues to return.

While the return of smell loss is concerning, says Dr. Rodney Schlosser, director of rhinology at the Medical University of South Carolina’s Nasal and Sinus Center, told DailyMail.com that simple smell therapy treatments – some of which you can do at home – can help a person regenerate their sense of smell over time to develop.

Just using commodities like flowers, coffee, fruit, or other sweet smells could help retrain the olfactory cells in your nose to start working again — much like a person trains a muscle.

Schlosser explains that regularly smelling goods at home could help retrain a person's sense of smell and fix the loss of a COVID-19 infection (file photo).

Schlosser explains that regularly smelling goods at home could help retrain a person's sense of smell and fix the loss of a COVID-19 infection (file photo).

Schlosser explains that regularly smelling goods at home could help retrain a person’s sense of smell and fix the loss of a COVID-19 infection (file photo).

“The very first variants in the pandemic had much higher odor loss rates,” explained Schlosser.

“As we progressed through the Omicron variant, these rates dropped quite significantly, but unfortunately the rates of odor loss appear to be increasing again and are similar to the earliest variants.”

He explains that the suspected reason for the loss of smell is that the virus attacks neurons in the nose, damaging the cells responsible for a person’s sense of smell.

While smell may have been the most overlooked sense before the pandemic, many in the last two years have realized just how important it is to life.

“One of the good things about the pandemic is that we now understand how important our sense of smell is to our quality of life,” he said.

dr Rodney Schlosser (pictured), director of rhinology at the Medical University of South Carolina's Nasal and Sinus Center, said these self-directed odor treatments could be very effective

dr Rodney Schlosser (pictured), director of rhinology at the Medical University of South Carolina's Nasal and Sinus Center, said these self-directed odor treatments could be very effective

dr Rodney Schlosser (pictured), director of rhinology at the Medical University of South Carolina’s Nasal and Sinus Center, said these self-directed odor treatments could be very effective

The sense of smell has many survival purposes, such as detecting unsafe or contaminated food and water and the ability to detect harmful chemicals in the air.

Smell is also key to a person’s sense of taste, and losing it greatly affects whether they can properly enjoy food.

“Imagine going to a BBQ or dinner with family and friends but can’t enjoy the food or a glass of wine because our sense of smell really determines our enjoyment of food and flavors.” said Schlosser.

“It’s really not our taste buds. It’s our smelling nerves.’

It can take years for a person’s smell to recover in many cases — if ever — but there are treatments that could help speed up the process and restore a person’s smell.

A doctor can prescribe a person nasal sprays, allergy medication, other medications, and even devices that could treat problems, but Schlosser says a possible solution could lie at home.

He recommends that people who suffer from odor problems smell things like candles, flowers or coffee regularly every day to rebuild their sense of smell.

Over time, they will find that their odor will slowly increase and even return to full strength within a few months.

“Up in the brain there are reading stem cells that can regenerate and develop into smelling nerves,” explained Schlosser.

He compared it to training a muscle that slowly builds strength.

“Just like when you go to physical therapy or when you go to a workout and you’re stressed and you can create a stimulus. The body [thinks] it has to respond to that external stimulus.”

“That’s what we think retraining smells like [does].’

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/health/expert-warns-that-covid-caused-smell-loss-is-returning-with-ba-5-variant/ Expert warns that Covid-induced odor loss is returning with the BA.5 variant

Brian Ashcraft

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