Florida “QAnon” power couple goes to prison for Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol

OCALA, Fla. (WFLA) – An Ocala couple seen forcing their way into the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021, is the latest protester in Florida to go to prison.

Jamie Buteau, 50, and Jennifer Buteau, 46, are one of five accused Florida couples arrested on charges related to the 2021 melee that left five dead, hundreds injured and more than $2,000 in property damage. 8 million US dollars was connected.

Investigators said about five minutes after entering the Capitol, the Buteau’s were “at the front of the mob,” preventing officers from closing large doors that would have cut off protesters from other restricted areas of the building.

Mr. Buteau was photographed picking up a chair and moments later was seen on video throwing it at a police officer, who was hit in the arm after the chair bounced off a wall.

His wife spat on police officers after the couple was sprayed with chemical irritants, investigators said.

Investigators said Buteau’s appearance in a 2018 documentary about QAnon helped link her to the Jan. 6 violence. QAnon is a political movement associated with the belief in the existence of satanic cannibals who control a child sex trafficking ring.

According to the George Washington University Program on Extremism, the Buteaus are now two of 559 defendants who have pleaded guilty.

Mr Buteau was sentenced to 22 months in prison for assaulting a public servant. His wife was sentenced to 90 days in prison for a demonstration at the Capitol.

Jon Lewis from the Extremism Program said the rift that sparked an attempt to stop the electoral process nearly three years ago is no better now.

“The narratives, the conspiracies and the grievances that attracted this violent crowd, including those from Florida to the U.S. Capitol, have not gone away,” Lewis said. “The threat has worsened, according to many extremism experts. “

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The Buteaus are two of the 105 Florida residents charged so far in connection with the Jan. 6 incident. Thirty-six are from the Tampa Bay area. Thirty-seven Florida residents have pleaded guilty and 13 have been convicted at trial.

Orlando Broadway actor Jamie Beeks is one of the few defendants in the country to be acquitted of the charges.

The judge concluded at his trial in July that there was insufficient evidence to convict the former Oath Keepers member, who was arrested while appearing in the play “Jesus Christ Superstar.”

Other Tampa Bay area defendants include the subject of one of the most memorable viral images of the day, in which Parrish resident Adam Johnson is seen smiling and waving as he approaches House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s lectern. lifts up.

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(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The grin was gone from Johnson’s face when he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to two and a half months in prison.

Englewood businessman Graydon Young was one of the first Floridians arrested. The veteran, who said he joined the Oath Keepers in December 2020, was also the first to plead guilty and agree to cooperate with the government.

During his first hearing in federal court in Tampa, Young dropped his head onto a table with a slight thud as the judge discussed the case.

He later testified against other Oath Keepers, telling the jury he had “acted like a traitor to my own government” during the attack.

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Graydon Young (photos from US Department of Justice paperwork)

Paul Hodgkins, described as a quiet man from Tampa, was burdened like many others. In a selfie on the House floor, where he stands next to the Speaker of the House’s lectern.

Hodgkins was sentenced to eight months in prison.

Hodgkin’s statement was similar to many others, according to his attorney Patrick Leduc, who said he protested the election but was blown away.

“This guy is dirt poor, working class, humble,” Leduc said at the time. “His worst nightmare is this.”

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(Senate TV via AP)

Robert Palmer of Largo was caught on video throwing a fire extinguisher, a board and a spear-like pole at police. Last fall, he cried in court after pleading guilty.

Palmer was sentenced to more than five years in prison, which at one point was the longest sentence related to the insurrection.

Palmer’s tenure was eclipsed in September when Henry Tarrio, a Proud Boy leader from Miami, was sentenced to 22 years in prison.

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Robert Palmer, US Capitol suspect (FBI)

Former congressional candidate Jeremy Brown, a retired Green Beret who once appeared in a Special Forces recruiting poster, spoke to 8 on Your Side from the Pinellas County Jail and insisted the video evidence would clear him.

“We weren’t even close to the Capitol when we found out the Capitol had been breached,” Brown said, referring to a group he was with that day. “There are political factors at play here and those who refuse to acknowledge them will never see the full picture and that is why I am taking my case to court.”

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Jonathan Pollock of Lakeland (Courtesy Polk County Sheriff’s Office)

Federal authorities are still searching for Jonathan Pollock, 24, of Lakeland. He is said to have attacked officers during the riot. The FBI is offering a $30,000 reward for information leading to his arrest and conviction.

8 On Your Side’s analysis of the data revealed several details about the Florida defendants.

The defendants range in age from 20 to 72, with an average age of about 43. In addition to the five Florida couple defendants, there are two father-son pairs and a sibling pair, Pollock and his sister.

The Florida defendants’ occupations include a doctor, a nurse, a rabbi, a pastor, a police officer and an adult film star. The group also includes 10 Proud Boys and eight Oath Keepers.

Luke Plunkett

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