Floridians stock up on groceries in torrential rain as powerful subtropical storm Nicole intensifies

Floridians were seen braving torrential rains to stock up on food and groceries ahead of Tropical Storm Nicole’s expected landfall on Wednesday and prepare for the potential hurricane – with Ian still fresh in their minds.

Southeast Florida residents flocked to businesses across the coast as officials issued a hurricane alert for the region late Monday.

The storm intensified from subtropical to tropical early Tuesday as it continued on a course that could hit anywhere from southern Florida to Jacksonville along the state’s east coast.

As of 9 a.m. ET, the storm was about 380 miles east-northeast of the Northwestern Bahamas and moving at 8 mph with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph.

In its latest advisory bulletin early Tuesday, the National Hurricane Center said the forecast track had shifted slightly north, onto a path that could take it directly over Orlando.

At this point the storm is ready continue to intensify, reaching peak wind speeds of 75 mph — equivalent to a Category 1 hurricane force.

Southeast Florida residents braved torrential rain to stock up on supplies ahead of Tropical Storm Nicole's expected landfall on Wednesday, after officials issued a hurricane channel alert for the region

Southeast Florida residents braved torrential rain to stock up on supplies ahead of Tropical Storm Nicole's expected landfall on Wednesday, after officials issued a hurricane channel alert for the region

Southeast Florida residents braved torrential rain to stock up on supplies ahead of Tropical Storm Nicole’s expected landfall on Wednesday, after officials issued a hurricane channel alert for the region

With Ian still fresh in mind, residents stocked up on water and other supplies to prepare for the potential hurricane, which strengthened into a tropical storm on Tuesday

With Ian still fresh in mind, residents stocked up on water and other supplies to prepare for the potential hurricane, which strengthened into a tropical storm on Tuesday

With Ian still fresh in mind, residents stocked up on water and other supplies to prepare for the potential hurricane, which strengthened into a tropical storm on Tuesday

The effects of the intensifying storm could already be seen in the region on Monday night. As of 9 a.m. ET, the storm was about 380 miles east-northeast of the Northwestern Bahamas and moving at 8 mph with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph

The effects of the intensifying storm could already be seen in the region on Monday night. As of 9 a.m. ET, the storm was about 380 miles east-northeast of the Northwestern Bahamas and moving at 8 mph with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph

The effects of the intensifying storm could already be seen in the region on Monday night. As of 9 a.m. ET, the storm was about 380 miles east-northeast of the Northwestern Bahamas and moving at 8 mph with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph

In its latest advisory bulletin early Tuesday, the National Hurricane Center said the forecast track had shifted slightly north, onto a path that could take it directly over Orlando

In its latest advisory bulletin early Tuesday, the National Hurricane Center said the forecast track had shifted slightly north, onto a path that could take it directly over Orlando

In its latest advisory bulletin early Tuesday, the National Hurricane Center said the forecast track had shifted slightly north, onto a path that could take it directly over Orlando

The unwelcome prospect of a November hurricane comes just weeks after Hurricane Ian wreaked havoc on the Gulf Coast and central Florida in September, killing at least 114 people.

This time, officials are being extra cautious as the unique late-season storm is expected to hit the coast Wednesday night, bringing storm surges and possible flooding.

“As Nicole’s structure begins to assume more tropical characteristics, strengthening will likely begin later in the day,” the Miami-based National Hurricane Center said in an advisory.

A number of warnings and observations remain. Many areas are still suffering from damage caused by Hurricane Ian, which hit Florida’s southwestern Gulf Coast as a Category 4 storm in late September before dumping large amounts of rain over much of the central part of the state.

Hurricane warnings are in effect for the Abacos, Berry Islands, Bimini and Grand Bahama Islands, the report said. Other areas of the Bahamas, including Andros Island, New Province and Eleuthera, remained under a tropical storm warning.

The hurricane center said the storm’s track shifted slightly north overnight, but the exact path remains uncertain.

It is expected to make landfall along the Florida coast late Wednesday or early Thursday as a Category 1 hurricane.

The storm is expected to make landfall along the Florida coast late Wednesday or early Thursday as a Category 1 hurricane, spurring cautious local residents to take necessary precautions

The storm is expected to make landfall along the Florida coast late Wednesday or early Thursday as a Category 1 hurricane, spurring cautious local residents to take necessary precautions

The storm is expected to make landfall along the Florida coast late Wednesday or early Thursday as a Category 1 hurricane, spurring cautious local residents to take necessary precautions

A number of warnings and observations remain. The areas are still suffering from damage caused by Hurricane Ian, which hit Florida's southwest coast in September as a Category 4 storm

A number of warnings and observations remain. The areas are still suffering from damage caused by Hurricane Ian, which hit Florida's southwest coast in September as a Category 4 storm

A number of warnings and observations remain. The areas are still suffering from damage caused by Hurricane Ian, which hit Florida’s southwest coast in September as a Category 4 storm

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In the US, tropical storm warnings and hurricane warnings have been issued for much of Florida’s Atlantic coast north from Miami to Altamaha Sound, Georgia. The warning area extends inland and includes Florida’s Lake Okeechobee, with tropical storm warnings in effect along the state’s Gulf Coast — from Bonita Beach in southwest Florida to the Ochlockonee River in the Panhandle.

The difference between a subtropical and tropical storm is largely academic. A subtropical storm is a non-frontal low-pressure system that exhibits characteristics of both tropical and extratropical cyclones and tends to have a larger wind field that extends much farther from their centers.

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/uncategorized/floridians-stock-up-on-food-in-torrential-rain-as-powerful-subtropical-storm-nicole-strengthens/ Floridians stock up on groceries in torrential rain as powerful subtropical storm Nicole intensifies

Brian Ashcraft

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