Manufacturers must meet strict criteria to make an organic claim on packaging

US food officials are cracking down on manufacturers who claim their products are organic.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has tightened the definition of organic, meaning manufacturers now have to meet much stricter manufacturing and animal welfare criteria to include the health claim on their label.

Officials said the earlier definition, originally enforced in 2002, was abused by companies taking advantage of consumers trying to be more health and environmentally conscious about their diets.

It comes after the Biden administration proposed that all foods and beverages sold in stores carry a color-coded or star rating system that displays their nutritional information.

The updated policy rules go into effect in March, and food businesses have one year to ensure they comply

The updated policy rules go into effect in March, and food businesses have one year to ensure they comply

The updated policy rules go into effect in March, and food businesses have one year to ensure they comply

The USDA has strict criteria that manufacturers must meet if they want to take advantage of a “certified organic” seal on their products.

Meats where the animals could not graze on pasture or be fed organic forage and forage, organically processed foods containing artificial preservatives, colors or flavorings, and foods grown or processed using genetically modified organisms were not allowed.

Thee USDA’s new guidelines hope to close loopholes through which ingredients that don’t meet organic criteria have wormed their way into the supply chain.

Federal standards require that products labeled as organic be made without toxic and long-lasting pesticides, synthetic nitrogen fertilizers, antibiotics, and artificial hormones.

Processes such as genetic engineering, sewage sludge and irradiation of products are also prohibited.

As the organic food industry has grown, food manufacturers have sidestepped organic requirements by sourcing ingredients overseas, where it’s more difficult to know if they meet US standards.

Now food companies must ensure that more members of their business supply chain comply with the criteria, including their brokers and distributors.

The rules come into effect in March and companies have one year to ensure compliance.

All organic imports are now required to be accompanied by a NOP import certificate, which ensures products meet USDA standards and was previously only required for EU and Japan imports.

Organic labeling is also required for products sold business-to-business before they reach the consumer.

Certificates for organic operations are also being standardized, and companies are having to submit data on the production of their organic food more and more frequently.

Companies could charge more for organic products. The higher price people are willing to pay for organic food was so lucrative that some manufacturers deliberately tried to deceive customers.

Just this week, two Minnesota farmers were charged over their alleged intent to pass off more than $46 million worth of chemically treated crops as organic between 2014 and 2021.

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/health-news/manufacturers-must-meet-strict-criteria-to-make-organic-claim-on-packaging/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=manufacturers-must-meet-strict-criteria-to-make-organic-claim-on-packaging Manufacturers must meet strict criteria to make an organic claim on packaging

Brian Ashcraft

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