Remote job ads decline for fifth straight month as work from home peaked

The share of jobs offering teleworking has fallen for the fifth straight month as companies accelerate their return to the office, new figures show.

Only 12 percent of jobs advertised in September were remote work positions, compared to 16 percent in January.

This is the lowest share of remote jobs since September 2021, when the job market rebounded after the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

The figures, compiled by jobs site LinkedIn, also revealed that 75 percent of executives plan to scale back working from home, reflecting the poor economic outlook, reports The Telegraph.

Josh Graff, Managing Director of LinkedIn Europe, told the newspaper: “The balance of power is beginning to shift back to employers as economic storm clouds gather and hiring slows.

“We’re already seeing companies freeze hiring and require employees to return to the office.”

He added: “Flexibility is increasingly becoming a matter of survival for many companies. Organizations that embrace flexible working, learning and development risk demotivating their workforce and pushing employees towards competitors who offer more attractive options.’

LinkedIn Europe chief executive Josh Graff said the site is seeing employees freeze hiring and is urging workers to return to the office

LinkedIn Europe chief executive Josh Graff said the site is seeing employees freeze hiring and is urging workers to return to the office

LinkedIn Europe chief executive Josh Graff said the site is seeing employees freeze hiring and is urging workers to return to the office

According to LinkedIn figures, 75 percent of executives want their employees to return to the office permanently

According to LinkedIn figures, 75 percent of executives want their employees to return to the office permanently

According to LinkedIn figures, 75 percent of executives want their employees to return to the office permanently

It comes after statistics earlier this year showed more than one in three Londoners worked from home between January and March.

That corresponded to almost two million employees, probably including 367,000 commuters who had previously traveled from another region of the country to work in the capital.

Despite the decline in jobs advertised as remote-based, UK employees still want to work from home, LinkedIn found.

Although the roles represented 12 percent of available positions, they attracted 20 percent of all applications.

But the UK remains second in the world behind the US in terms of the number of home-based jobs, the study found.

It comes after business leaders warned of a risk to worker productivity allowing home working to continue. Sir James Dyson wrote in the Telegraph in March this year that the British economy “cannot afford such a lax approach”.

Sir James said: “The Government is ignoring the fact that this is the case for many companies, particularly creative companies like Dyson [homeworking] stifling important learning and collaboration, stunting the development of our people, preventing access to vital equipment and laboratories, and undermining the security of our intellectual property.’

But while larger companies seem to be pushing for a full return to the office, some small businesses appear to be sticking with working from home due to the economic crisis and the cost of renting office space.

According to Hitachi Capital Business Finance, companies with fewer than 50 employees save on average nearly £4,000 a month by not having to pay for an office.

They will be more likely to be working entirely from home well into next year, the report said.

A survey of more than 1,000 small business owners found that one in four plan to work entirely from home by at least April next year, while a similar number plan hybrid working.

Joanna Morris of Hitachi Capital Business Finance said: “As the worst of the pandemic hopefully begins to fade and the option to return to permanent work comes back to the table, we can expect most to take that option and return to “normal”.

“However, this research is a reminder that it may not be the perfect solution for everyone.

‘As with any business decision owners make, particularly over the past 18 months, there are a number of factors that must first be considered, with understandably often giving heavier weight to the bottom line.

‘The only positive to come out of this particularly challenging time has been the requirement to be much more flexible and open-minded than ever when it comes to making changes in the business that will bring long-term benefits.’

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/health/adverts-for-remote-jobs-decline-for-fifth-month-in-a-row-as-work-from-home-boom-past-its-peak/ Remote job ads decline for fifth straight month as work from home peaked

Brian Ashcraft

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