Sticking to seven healthy habits can almost halve your risk of having a stroke, the study claims

Sticking to seven healthy habits can almost halve your risk of having a stroke, a study finds.

Researchers at the University of Texas at Houston say that good nutrition and regular exercise can even offset any genetic risk.

The other important steps are quitting smoking and losing weight.

Experts have followed 11,500 middle-aged adults in the US for almost 30 years and observed how their lifestyle affects their risk of stroke.

A healthy lifestyle could offset a high genetic risk of stroke by up to 43 percent, according to a University of Texas study released today. Chart shows: The risk of having a stroke at some point in a person's life over time for people who follow the seven habits (dark green), follow some of them (light green), or follow few of them (grey)

A healthy lifestyle could offset a high genetic risk of stroke by up to 43 percent, according to a University of Texas study released today. Chart shows: The risk of having a stroke at some point in a person's life over time for people who follow the seven habits (dark green), follow some of them (light green), or follow few of them (grey)

A healthy lifestyle could offset a high genetic risk of stroke by up to 43 percent, according to a University of Texas study released today. Chart shows: The risk of having a stroke at some point in a person’s life over time for people who follow the seven habits (dark green), follow some of them (light green), or follow few of them (grey)

The habits, developed by the American Heart Association, are called “Life’s Simple 7.”

Although listed as seven, there are only four modifiable factors. The other three — maintaining normal blood pressure, controlling cholesterol, and lowering blood sugar — are corollaries of staying healthy.

Stroke affects more than 100,000 Britons each year and claims 38,000 lives – making it the fourth leading cause of death in the UK and a leading cause of disability.

Nearly 800,000 people in the US are struck down each year, and 137,000 die.

Age, high blood pressure, smoking, obesity, lack of exercise and diabetes are known to increase the risk of stroke.

Another risk factor is family history of the condition, when a vessel is either blocked or bursts – cutting off blood flow to parts of the brain.

What Are Life’s Simple 7 Habits That May Reduce Your Risk Of Stroke?

  1. Maintain a good diet
  2. Exercise regularly
  3. Do not smoke
  4. lose weight
  5. maintaining normal blood pressure
  6. Cholesterol Control
  7. Lowering of blood sugar

The study, in the Journal of the American Heart Association, followed 11,568 adults ages 45 to 64 for an average of 28 years.

Participants were given a “polygenic stroke risk score” – based on blood tests that identified mutations associated with the condition. Genetic factors were used to assess how likely it was that they would suffer a stroke in their lifetime.

Their medical records were also reviewed to determine how well they were following the seven habits of life.

Low cholesterol was scored based on whether and how much lipid-lowering drugs — like statins — they were taking.

Blood pressure was also measured based on the medications people were taking, while blood sugar was assessed based on whether they were being treated for diabetes.

Smoking status was recorded, BMI showed body weight, diet was guessed at with fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity was measured in minutes per week.

Participants with the highest genetic risk and the poorest heart health had the highest lifetime risk of suffering a stroke, at around 25 percent.

Those with the lowest polygenic risk scores had a lifetime risk of 9.6 percent. Those with an average score had a 13.8 percent risk.

But for those who practiced Life’s Simple 7, it dropped by 30 to 43 percent regardless of their genetic risk, analysis shows.

Following the practices added up to nearly six more years of stroke-free living.

Overall, the healthiest group had the fewest stroke cases (6 percent), while most were those who followed the habits the least (57 percent).

According to lead author Professor Myriam Fornage, a geneticist at Texas University in Houston, the results offer hope for a screening program.

She said: “Our study confirmed that changing lifestyle risk factors, such as B. controlling blood pressure, can offset a genetic risk of stroke.

“We can use genetic information to determine who is at higher risk and encourage them to adopt healthy cardiovascular lifestyles, such as following the AHA’s Life’s Simple 7, to lower that risk and stay longer.” to lead healthier lives.”

THE CAUSES OF THE BLOW

There are two main types of stroke:

1. ISCHEMIC STROKE

An ischemic stroke — which accounts for 80 percent of strokes — occurs when a blood vessel that prevents blood from reaching a part of the brain becomes blocked.

2. Hemorrhagic stroke

The less common, a hemorrhagic stroke, occurs when a blood vessel ruptures and floods one part of the brain with too much blood while other areas aren’t getting enough blood.

It can be the result of an AVM, or an arteriovenous malformation (an abnormal collection of blood vessels) in the brain.

Thirty percent of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage die before reaching the hospital. Another 25 percent die within 24 hours. And 40 percent of those who survive die within a week.

RISK FACTORS

Age, high blood pressure, smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, family history and history of a previous stroke or TIA (a mini-stroke) are risk factors for stroke.

SYMPTOMS OF A STROKE

  • Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, difficulty speaking or understanding
  • Sudden visual disturbances or blurred vision in one or both eyes
  • Sudden difficulty walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

RESULTS

Of the approximately three out of four people who survive a stroke, many will have lifelong disabilities.

These include difficulty walking, communicating, eating, and doing everyday tasks or chores.

TREATMENT

Both are potentially fatal, and patients must be operated on within three hours or put on a drug called tPA (Tissue Plasminogen Activator) to save them.

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/health-news/sticking-to-seven-healthy-habits-may-almost-halve-your-risk-of-suffering-a-stroke-study-claims/ Sticking to seven healthy habits can almost halve your risk of having a stroke, the study claims

Brian Ashcraft

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