Why is the NHS doing less but costing you MORE?

Healthcare is performing fewer surgeries and scans each month even as its funding increases by a fifth, analysis shows.

NHS England performed 600,000 fewer surgeries and scans in the first nine months of 2022 compared to the same period in 2019, according to analysis by the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

The slump in activity was logged despite the healthcare budget growing by almost £30billion over the same period and fewer people than expected queuing for treatment, the IFS said.

The research institute suggested health chiefs will now struggle to fulfill their promise to increase capacity by 30 percent before the pandemic by 2024.

And it warned that its overall waitlist could continue to rise “well beyond next year” if it didn’t increase its activity. The health service has warned that the backlog will continue to grow into 2024.

Data from this month showed NHS waiting lists for routine hospital care hit a record 7.1 million in September – 60 per cent higher than before the pandemic.

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Official figures show that 7.1 million people in England were queuing for routine hospital treatment such as hip and knee surgery by the end of September - the equivalent of one in eight people (red line). The number includes more than 400,000 people who have been waiting, often in pain, for over a year (yellow bars)

Official figures show that 7.1 million people in England were queuing for routine hospital treatment such as hip and knee surgery by the end of September - the equivalent of one in eight people (red line). The number includes more than 400,000 people who have been waiting, often in pain, for over a year (yellow bars)

Official figures show that 7.1 million people in England were queuing for routine hospital treatment such as hip and knee surgery by the end of September – the equivalent of one in eight people (red line). The number includes more than 400,000 people who have been waiting, often in pain, for over a year (yellow bars)

Meanwhile, emergency care performance has deteriorated to new lows. More than 1,400 A&E visitors had to wait more than 12 hours for care every day in October (yellow bars), while the lowest proportion on record was seen within four hours - the NHS target (red line).

Meanwhile, emergency care performance has deteriorated to new lows. More than 1,400 A&E visitors had to wait more than 12 hours for care every day in October (yellow bars), while the lowest proportion on record was seen within four hours - the NHS target (red line).

Meanwhile, emergency care performance has deteriorated to new lows. More than 1,400 A&E visitors had to wait more than 12 hours for care every day in October (yellow bars), while the lowest proportion on record was seen within four hours – the NHS target (red line).

Since records began in 2017, ambulance performance stats have taken longer for the show's paramedics to get to category one, two and three calls in October. Ambulances took an average of 1 hour, 1 minute and 19 seconds to respond to category two calls (red bars). such as burns, epilepsy and stroke. That's more than three times the 18-minute target

Since records began in 2017, ambulance performance stats have taken longer for the show's paramedics to get to category one, two and three calls in October. Ambulances took an average of 1 hour, 1 minute and 19 seconds to respond to category two calls (red bars). such as burns, epilepsy and stroke. That's more than three times the 18-minute target

Since records began in 2017, ambulance performance stats have taken longer for the show’s paramedics to get to category one, two and three calls in October. Ambulances took an average of 1 hour, 1 minute and 19 seconds to respond to category two calls (red bars). such as burns, epilepsy and stroke. That’s more than three times the 18-minute target

Cancer care collapsed in September. Only 60.5 percent of patients started cancer treatment within two months of being referred for chemotherapy or radiation therapy (red line). The figure is down from 61.9 percent a month earlier and is the lowest on record since October 2009. The NHS says 85 patients should start treatment within that timeframe

Cancer care collapsed in September. Only 60.5 percent of patients started cancer treatment within two months of being referred for chemotherapy or radiation therapy (red line). The figure is down from 61.9 percent a month earlier and is the lowest on record since October 2009. The NHS says 85 patients should start treatment within that timeframe

Cancer care collapsed in September. Only 60.5 percent of patients started cancer treatment within two months of being referred for chemotherapy or radiation therapy (red line). The figure is down from 61.9 percent a month earlier and is the lowest on record since October 2009. The NHS says 85 patients should start treatment within that timeframe

An NHS spokesman said: “Thanks to advances in the way the NHS works, many patients no longer have to put themselves on the waiting list as advice and guidance from specialists means faster care for patients and when this is taken into account the NHS indeed is Caring for more elective patients than before the pandemic.

“Hospitals have achieved this despite coping with higher staff absenteeism due to Covid, reduced hospital capacity due to problems releasing patients to social care and higher than usual emergency pressures.”

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

https://www.soundhealthandlastingwealth.com/health-news/why-is-the-nhs-doing-less-but-costing-you-more/ Why is the NHS doing less but costing you MORE?

Brian Ashcraft

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